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North Charles Street

6213 N. Charles Street
Baltimore MD 21212
410-377-8040
Mon - Sat: 7am - 8pm
Sun: 8am - 7pm

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ON STORE LOT

Roland Avenue

5113 Roland Avenue
Baltimore MD 21210
410-323-3656
Mon - Sat: 7am - 8pm
Sun: 8am - 7pm

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DEEPDENE GARAGE

CHARM CITY COOK: Thanksgiving sides, family favorites and new traditions

Sides. Even the word indicates an afterthought. Not at Thanksgiving. Nope. Sides can really be some of the best things of the entire meal. Give me turkey, though, I gotta have it. And, honestly, for me, Thanksgiving is really about traditions. Maybe your mom made the best candied yams or your uncle was the bird carver? For me, it’s about that dollop of sauerkraut (this is Baltimore, after all) to remind me of my sweet dad. He was the absolute best.

SIMON SAYS: CULINARY CONVERSATION PIECES

I don't know about you, but after hosting 25 Thanksgiving dinners, “help” isn’t necessarily wanted. So, when my out-of-town cousins offer to come early and lend a hand, I find it more helpful to have delicious decoys at the ready!

Here are a few fun and easy solutions to feed and entertain guests who arrive early—so you can maintain your carefully honed rhythm without losing a beat.

LOCAL, GREEN GROWING

Eating locally doesn’t get much better than Uccellini Aeroponics, whose cutting edge, custom-built, indoor aeroponic setup provides a year-round growing environment for gorgeous, “living lettuce” bouquets—cultivated in downtown Baltimore!

Founder/grower Dominic Uccellini explains that his pesticide and soil-free, vertically-stacked growing system uses a combination of LED light and nutrient-fortified, filtered water mist to produce hundreds of fully-grown living lettuce blooms, within a relatively small footprint, in under 10 weeks.

BE THE GUEST WITH THE BEST

 

As the old adage says, never show up to dinner empty-handed—however, special occasions like Passover deserve extra special attention. Here, events coordinator (and self-proclaimed dinner party diva) Amy Simon shares five hostess/host gift recommendations to bring along for Seder dinner:

 

FIRE UP THE GRILL FOR THANKSGIVING

Thanksgiving comes with its own set of questions: How many cooks can fit in the kitchen? How do you feed a large crowd a sizeable whole turkey along with all the sides and serve everything at once? A 15 pound turkey usually takes up two thirds of a normal size oven for a good 4 to 5 hours. The most delicious answer to this problem is to cook the turkey on your outdoor grill which will free the oven up for all of your side dishes—in fact, in my family, it wouldn't be a holiday meal without my dad and I cooking a chipotle-based turkey on my Weber charcoal grill!

SITTING FOR DINNER

According to Psychology Today, when faced with choosing where to sit at the dining table, each guest sends unspoken messages to the guests sitting around them. Sitting near the middle suggests a level of approachability and collaborativeness, whereas sitting at either end is a power position—and by becoming the presumed leader, guests will be looking to the head to propose the toast.

"STEAK" YOUR CLAIM

As Father Day approaches, just think of two things for Dad: A hot grill and a thick, juicy steak. A surefire way to please Dad is to serve him a premium, custom-cut rib eye or NY strip steak from Eddie's.

MEMORIAL DAY ENTERTAINING

Whether you're going to the beach or having a "stay-cation" at home, Memorial Day weekend calls for cookouts, get-togethers and fun with family and friends. Rain or shine, there will be lots of entertaining.

Plan an easy barbecue, or have your fridge stocked for drop-in company. Eddie's has everything you need  to feed your friends and enjoy the weekend as well.

SPRING CLEAN YOUR PANTRY

Finally, the Nor'easters are over and spring weather is here. Welcome the flavors, aromas and freshness of spring in your home by refreshing your pantry. Here are some easy guidelines to rejuvenating -- or shall we say "resuscitating" -- your pantry.

"EGG-CEPTIONAL" EGGS

The spring holidays of Easter and Passover will soon be here, along with all of the traditions we love and savor. Each holiday has its unique features; however, both have a versatile and delicious common denominator. The egg, a symbol of new life and rebirth, makes its way to celebrations of Passover, beginning March 30, and Easter, April 1. The age-old question, "Which came first, the chicken or the egg?" sheds new light during the spring holidays and has gotten way more complicated.

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